Loco about locos

A steam locomotive is a railway locomotive that produces its pulling power through a steam engine. These locomotives are fueled by burning combustible material—usually coal, wood, or oil—to produce steam in a boiler. The steam moves reciprocating pistons which are mechanically connected to the locomotive’s main wheels (drivers). Both fuel and water supplies are carried with the locomotive, either on the locomotive itself or in wagons (tenders) pulled behind. The first steam locomotive was made by Richard Trevithick on 21 February 1804, two years after the railway locomotive he made in 1802 or the road locomotive he made in 1801.

Steam locomotives were first developed in Great Britain during the early 19th century and dominated railway transport until the middle of the 20th century. From the early 1900s, they were gradually superseded by electric and diesel locomotives.

Much of the steam Railway network relies on the hard work, dedication and skills of volunteers not only to run the trains but to restore and maintain the engines, rolling stock, trackwork and buildings.